Networking Guide

This guide will help you understand how to quickly get connected to your sensor to start doing great things with it. When trying to connect to the sensor for the first time there are some basics that need to be achieved for successful communication between the host machine and the sensor.

We need to ensure that the sensor receives an IP address from the host machine so that we can talk to it. This can be achieved with a few different methods such as DHCP, link-local, static IP. We also need to ensure that the sensor and the host machine are talking on the same subnet.

Once the sensor receives an IP address and is on the correct subnet we can talk to it using its hostname, os-991234567890.local, where 991234567890 is the sensor serial number. The sensor serial number can be found on a sticker affixed to the top of the sensor.

Based on the platform being used the user can refer to the following:

Networking Terminology

If some of this terminology is new to you don’t fret, we have defined some of it for you. Here is some basic terminology that will help you digest the steps and be more familiar with networking in general.

IPv4 Address

This is the address that can be used to communicate with devices on a network. The format of an IPv4 address is a set of four octets, xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx with xxx being in the range 0-255. For example, your host machine Ethernet port may have an address of 192.0.2.1 and your sensor may have an address of 192.0.2.130.

DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) Server

This is a server that may run on your host machine, switch, or router which will serve an IPv4 address to a device that is connected to it. It will ensure that each device connected will have a unique IPv4 address on the network.

Link-local IPv4 Address

These are the addresses that are self-assigned between the host machine and a device connected to it in the absence of a DHCP server. They are only valid within the network segment that the host is connected to. The addresses lie within the block 169.254.0.0/16 (169.254.0.0 - 169.254.255.255).

Subnet Mask

This defines which bits of the IPv4 address are the network prefix and which are the host identifiers. See the table below for an example.

Binary Form

Decimal-dot notation

IP address

11000000.00000000.00000010.10000010

192.0.2.130

Subnet mask

11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000

255.255.255.0

Network prefix

11000000.00000000.00000010.00000000

192.0.2.0

Host identifier

00000000.00000000.00000000.10000010

0.0.0.130

Note

Subnet mask can be abbreviated with the number of bits that apply to the network prefix. E.g. /24 for 255.255.255.0 or /16 for 255.255.0.0.

Static IPv4 Address

This is when you specify the addresses for the host machine and/or connected device rather than letting the host machine self-assign or using a DHCP server. For example, you may want to specify the host machine IPv4 address to be 192.0.2.100/24 and the sensor to be 192.0.2.200.

Hostname

This is the more human readable name that comes with your sensor. The sensor’s hostname is os-991234567890.local, where 991234567890 is the sensor serial number.

Note

The .local portion of the hostname denotes the local domain used in combination with multicast DNS (mDNS). It is employed when using the sensor in a local network environment with supporting operating system services. This means when the sensor is directly connected to the host machine or if the host machine and sensor are on the same network connected through a router or switch. If you are trying to connect to the sensor on another domain with a supporting DHCP and DNS server configuration you should replace the .local with the domain the sensor is on. For example, if the sensor is connected to a network with domain ouster-domain.com the sensor will be reachable on os-991234567890.ouster-domain.com.

Windows

The following steps have been tested on Windows 10. The sensor’s hostname is os-991234567890.local, where 991234567890 is the sensor serial number. The sensor serial number can be found on a sticker affixed to the top of the sensor.

Connecting the Sensor

  1. Connect the sensor to an available Ethernet port on your host machine or router.

  2. The sensor will automatically obtain an IP address either through link-local or DHCP (if preconfigured) depending on your network configuration.

Note

It can take up to 60 seconds to obtain an IP address from the initial power-up of the sensor.

The Sensor Homepage

  1. Type os-991234567890.local/ in the address bar of your browser to view the sensor homepage

Note

If you are unable to load the sensor homepage, follow the steps in Determining the IPv4 Address of the Sensor to verify your sensor is on the network and has a valid IPv4 address.

Determining the IPv4 Address of the Sensor

  1. Open a command prompt on the host machine by pressing Win+X and then A

  2. Use the ping command to determine the IPv4 address of the sensor

Command

ping -4 [sensor_hostname]

Example

C:\\WINDOWS\\system32>ping -4 |os-sn|

Note

If this command hangs you may need to go back and configure your interface to link-local in the section Connecting the Sensor

Response

Pinging |os-sn| [|sensor-ip|] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from |sensor-ip|: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from |sensor-ip|: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from |sensor-ip|: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from |sensor-ip|: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64

Ping statistics for |sensor-ip|:
  Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123. If your sensor IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x it is connected via link-local.

  1. You can also browse for the sensor IPv4 address using dns-sd and the sensor hostname. Learn more about this in Finding a Sensor with mDNS Service Discovery

Command

dns-sd -G v4 [sensor_hostname]

Example

C:\\WINDOW\\system32>dns-sd -G v4 |os-sn|

Response

Timestamp     A/R  Flags   if   Hostname                Address         TTL
14:22:46.897  Add  2       6    |os-sn|  |sensor-ip|   120

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123. If your sensor IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x it is connected via link-local.

Determining the IPv4 Address of the Interface

  1. Open a command prompt by pressing Win+X and then A

  2. View the IPv4 address of your interfaces

Command

netsh interface ip show config

Example

C:\\WINDOWS\\system32>netsh interface ip show config

Response

Configuration for interface "Local Area Connection"
    DHCP enabled:                         Yes
    IP Address:                           |interface-ip|
    Subnet Prefix:                        169.254.0.0/16 (mask 255.255.0.0)
    InterfaceMetric:                      25
    DNS servers configured through DHCP:  None
    Register with which suffix:           Primary only
    WINS servers configured through DHCP: None

Configuration for interface "Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1"
    DHCP enabled:                         No
    IP Address:                           127.0.0.1
    Subnet Prefix:                        127.0.0.0/8 (mask 255.0.0.0)
    InterfaceMetric:                      75
    Statically Configured DNS Servers:    None
    Register with which suffix:           Primary only
    Statically Configured WINS Servers:   None
  • In this example, your sensor is plugged into interface “Local Area Connection”

  • Your host IPv4 address will be on the line that starts with IP Address: In this case it is 169.254.0.1

Note

If your interface IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x, it is connected via link-local to the sensor. This means that Windows self-assigned an IP address in the absence of a DHCP server.

Setting the Host Interface to DHCP

Use this to set your interface to automatically obtain an IP address via DHCP. This is useful for architectures that need to be more plug and play.

Set your interface to DHCP.

Command

netsh interface ip set address ["Network Interface Name"] dhcp

Example

with interface name "Local Area Connection"

C:\\WINDOWS\\system32>netsh interface ip set address "Local Area Connection" dhcp

Response

blank

Setting the Host Interface to Static IP

Use this to set your interface to be assigned a static IPv4 address. This is useful for controlling the IP address that the sensor will be sending data to.

Set your interface to static.

Command

netsh interface ip set address name="Network Interface Name" static [IP address] [Subnet Mask]
[Gateway]

Example

with interface name “Local Area Connection” and IPv4 address 192.0.2.1/24.

C:\\WINDOWS\\system32>netsh interface ip set address name="Local Area Connection"
 static 192.0.2.1/24

Note

The /24 is shorthand for Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0

Response

blank

Finding a Sensor with mDNS Service Discovery

The sensor announces its presence on the network using Multicast Domain Name Service (mDNS) with a service type named _roger._tcp. You can use service discovery tools such as Bonjour browser (Windows) to find all sensors connected to the network.

Note

Click Bonjour to install Bonjour Browser.

Example using Bonjour Browser:

Step 1: User can download the Bonjour Browser

../../../_images/pc_download_bonjour.png

Downloading Application

../../../_images/setup_bonjour.png

Software Setup and Installation

Step 2: Sensor announces its presence on the network using Multicast Domain Name Service (mDNS) with a service type named _roger._tcp. Click on this to get all the information required.

../../../_images/rogrtcpbonjour.png

_roger._tcp

macOS

The following steps have been tested on macOS 10.15.4. The sensor’s hostname is os-991234567890.local, where 991234567890 is the sensor serial number. The sensor serial number can be found on a sticker affixed to the top of the sensor.

Connecting the Sensor

  1. Connect the sensor to an available Ethernet port on your host machine or router.

  2. The sensor will automatically obtain an IP address either through link-local or DHCP (if preconfigured) depending on your network configuration.

Note

It can take up to 60 seconds to obtain an IP address from the initial power-up of the sensor.

The Sensor Homepage

  1. Type os-991234567890.local in the address bar of your browser to view the sensor homepage

Note

If you are unable to load the sensor homepage, follow the steps in Determining the IPv4 Address of the Sensor to verify your sensor is on the network and has a valid IPv4 address.

Determining the IPv4 Address of the Sensor

  1. Open a Terminal window on the host machine by pressing CMD+SPACE and typing Terminal in the search bar, then press enter.

  2. Use the ping command to determine the IPv4 address of the sensor

Command

ping -c3 [sensor_hostname]

Example

Mac-Computer:~ username$ ping -c3 |os-sn|

Note

If this command hangs you may need to go back and configure your interface to link-local in the section Connecting the Sensor

Response

PING |os-sn| (|sensor-ip|): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from |sensor-ip|: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.644 ms
64 bytes from |sensor-ip|: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.617 ms
64 bytes from |sensor-ip|: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.299 ms

--- |os-sn| ping statistics ---
3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0.0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 0.299/0.520/0.644/0.157 ms

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123. If your sensor IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x it is connected via link-local.

  1. You can also browse for the sensor IPv4 address using dns-sd and the sensor hostname. Learn more about this in Finding a Sensor

Command

dns-sd -G v4 [sensor_hostname]

Example

Mac-Computer:~ username$ dns-sd -G v4 |os-sn|

Response

DATE: ---Tue 28 Apr 2020---
11:40:43.228  ...STARTING...
Timestamp     A/R  Flags  if  Hostname                Address           TTL
11:40:43.414  Add  2      18  |os-sn|.  |sensor-ip|     120

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123. If your sensor IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x it is connected via link-local.

Determining the IPv4 Address of the Interface

This will help you find the IPv4 address of the interface that you have plugged the sensor into. It is helpful to know which interface you have plugged into, e.g. en1 in the example below.

  1. Open a Terminal window on the host machine by pressing CMD+SPACE and typing Terminal in the search bar, then press enter.

  2. View the IPv4 address of your interfaces

Command

ifconfig

Example

Mac-Computer:~ username$ ifconfig

Response

   lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 16384
      options=1203<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,TXSTATUS,SW_TIMESTAMP>
      inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
      inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
      inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
      nd6 options=201<PERFORMNUD,DAD>
   en0: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
      options=400<CHANNEL_IO>
      ether 38:f9:d3:d6:33:8a
      inet6 fe80::1c30:1246:93a2:9f68%en0 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x7
      inet 192.0.2.7 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.0.2.255
      nd6 options=201<PERFORMNUD,DAD>
      media: autoselect
      status: active
   en1: flags=8963<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
      options=400<CHANNEL_IO>
      ether 48:65:ee:1d:22:35
      inet6 fe80::c27:1917:47ed:bcfe%en1 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x12
      inet |interface-ip| netmask 0xffff0000 broadcast 169.254.255.255
      nd6 options=201<PERFORMNUD,DAD>
      media: autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
      status: active


* In this example, your sensor is plugged into interface ``en1``
* Your host IPv4 address will be on the line that starts with ``inet``: In this case it is |interface-ip|

Note

If your interface IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x, it is connected via link-local to the sensor. This means that the macOS self-assigned an IP address in the absence of a DHCP server.

Setting the Host Interface to DHCP

Use this to set your interface to automatically obtain an IP address via DHCP. This is useful for architectures that need to be more plug and play.

Set your interface to DHCP

Command

sudo ipconfig set [interface_name] DHCP

Example

with interface name en1

Mac-Computer:~ username$ sudo ipconfig set en1 DHCP

Response

blank

Note: However you can verify the change has been made with the ``ifconfig`` command.
      The ``inet`` line will be blank if nothing is plugged in or shows the DHCP or
      link-local self-assigned IPv4 address. E.g. |interface-ip|


en1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500

options=6407<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,CHANNEL_IO,PARTIAL_CSUM,ZEROINVERT_CSUM>
   ether 48:65:ee:1d:22:35
   inet6 fe80::1c24:5e0a:2ea8:12e9%en1 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x7
   inet |interface-ip| netmask 0xffff0000 broadcast 169.254.255.255
   nd6 options=201<PERFORMNUD,DAD>
   media: autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
   status: active

Setting the Host Interface to Static IP

Use this to set your interface to be assigned a static IPv4 address. This is useful for controlling the IP address that the sensor will be sending data to.

Set your interface to static

Command

sudo ipconfig set [interface_name] MANUAL [ip_address] [subnet_mask]

Example

with interface name en1 and IPv4 address 192.0.2.1 and subnet mask 255.255.255.0.

Mac-Computer:~ username$ sudo ipconfig set en1 MANUAL 192.0.2.1 255.255.255.0

Note

The /24 is shorthand for Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0

Response

blank

Note: However you can verify the change has been made with the ``ifconfig`` command.
      The ``inet`` line will show the static IPv4 address. e.g. ``192.0.2.1``.

en1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500

options=6407<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,CHANNEL_IO,PARTIAL_CSUM,ZEROINVERT_CSUM>
 ether 48:65:ee:1d:22:35
 inet6 fe80::1c24:5e0a:2ea8:12e9%en1 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x7
 inet 192.0.2.1 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.0.2.255
 nd6 options=201<PERFORMNUD,DAD>
 media: autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
 status: active

Finding a Sensor

With mDNS Service Discovery:

The sensor announces its presence on the network using Multicast Domain Name Service (mDNS) with a service type named _roger._tcp. You can use service discovery tools such as dns-sd (Windows/macOS) to find all sensors connected to the network.

  1. Find all sensors and their associated service text on a network.

Command

dns-sd -Z [service type]

Example

Mac-Computer:~ username$ dns-sd -Z _roger._tcp

Response

Browsing for _roger._tcp
DATE: ---Thu 30 Apr 2020---
17:27:52.242  ...STARTING...

; To direct clients to browse a different domain, substitute that domain in
 place of '@'
lb._dns-sd._udp                                 PTR     @

; In the list of services below, the SRV records will typically reference dot-local
 Multicast DNS names.
; When transferring this zone file data to your unicast DNS server, you'll need to
 replace those dot-local
; names with the correct fully-qualified (unicast) domain name of the target host
 offering the service.

_roger._tcp                                   PTR
Ouster Sensor |sn|._roger._tcp
Ouster Sensor |sn|._roger._tcp    SRV     0 0 7501 |os-sn|. ;
Replace with unicast FQDN of target host
Ouster Sensor |sn|._roger._tcp    TXT     "pn=840-102145-B" "sn= |sn|"
"fw=ousteros-image-prod-aries-v2.0.0-20200417193957" "sn= |sn|"
  1. Browse for the sensor IPv4 address using dns-sd and the sensor hostname.

Command

dns-sd -G v4 [sensor_hostname]

Example

Mac-Computer:~ username$ dns-sd -G v4 |os-sn|

Response

DATE: ---Thu 30 Apr 2020---
17:37:33.155  ...STARTING...
Timestamp     A/R  Flags  if  Hostname                Address           TTL
17:37:33.379  Add  2      7   |os-sn|.  |sensor-ip|     120

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123

With Discovery App:

Step 1: User can download the Discovery DNS-SD

../../../_images/download_discovery.png

Downloading Application

Step 2: Using finder, the user can search for Discovery

../../../_images/finder.png

Finding the Application

Step 3: Sensor announces its presence on the network using Multicast Domain Name Service (mDNS) with a service type named _roger._tcp. Click on this to get all the information required.

../../../_images/discovery_ipv4.png

_roger._tcp

Linux

The following steps have been tested on Ubuntu 18.04 & 20.04.4 LTS. The sensor’s hostname is os-991234567890.local, where 991234567890 is the sensor serial number. The sensor serial number can be found on a sticker affixed to the top of the sensor.

Connecting the Sensor

  1. Connect the sensor to an available Ethernet port on your host machine or router.

  2. The sensor will automatically obtain an IP address either through link-local or DHCP (if preconfigured) depending on your network configuration.

  3. If directly connecting to the host machine you may need to set your Ethernet interface to Link-Local Only mode. This can be done via the command line or GUI. See instructions in Setting the Interface to Link-Local Only

Note

It can take up to 60 seconds to obtain an IP address from the initial power-up of the sensor.

The Sensor Homepage

  1. Type os-991234567890.local/ in the address bar of your browser to view the sensor homepage

Note

If you are unable to load the sensor homepage, follow the steps in Determining the IPv4 Address of the Sensor to verify your sensor is on the network and has a valid IPv4 address.

Determining the IPv4 Address of the Sensor

  1. Open a Terminal window on the host machine by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T.

  2. Use the ping command to determine the IPv4 address of the sensor

Command

ping -4 -c3 [sensor_hostname]

Example

username@ubuntu:~$ ping -4 -c3 |os-sn|

Note

If this command hangs you may need to go back and configure your interface to link-local in the section Setting the Interface to Link-Local Only

Response

PING |os-sn| (|sensor-ip|) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from |os-sn| (|sensor-ip|): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=1.56 ms
64 bytes from |os-sn| (|sensor-ip|): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.893 ms
64 bytes from |os-sn| (|sensor-ip|): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64
time=0.568 ms

--- |os-sn| ping statistics ---
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2025ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.568/1.008/1.565/0.416 ms

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123. If your sensor IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x it is connected via link-local.

  1. You can also browse for the sensor IPv4 address using avahi-browse and the sensor service type, which is _roger._tcp. Learn more about this in Finding a Sensor with mDNS Service Discovery

Command

avahi-browse -lrt [service type]

Example

username@ubuntu:~$ avahi-browse -lrt _roger._tcp

Response

+   eth0 IPv6 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp          local
+   eth0 IPv4 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp          local
=   eth0 IPv6 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp          local
   hostname = [|os-sn|]
   address = [fe80::be0f:a7ff:fe00:1852]
   port = [7501]
   txt = ["fw=ousteros-image-prod-aries-v2.0.0-20200417193957" "sn=99201000067
8" "pn=840-102145-B"]
=   eth0 IPv4 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp          local
   hostname = [|os-sn|]
   address = [|sensor-ip|]
   port = [7501]
   txt = ["fw=ousteros-image-prod-aries-v2.0.0-20200417193957" "sn= |sn|"
          "pn=840-102145-B"]

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123. If your sensor IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x it is connected via link-local.

Determining the IPv4 Address of the Interface

This will help you find the IPv4 address of the interface that you have plugged the sensor into. It is helpful to know which interface you have plugged into, e.g. eth0 in the example below.

  1. Open a Terminal window on the host machine by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T.

  2. View the IPv4 address of your interfaces

Command

ip addr

Example

username@ubuntu:~$ ip addr

Response

1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group
       default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: eth0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group
       default qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:0c:29:2b:cc:48 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet |interface-ip|/16 brd 169.254.255.255 scope link noprefixroute eth0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::be9f:d2a4:4451:3dfe/64 scope link noprefixroute
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
3: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group
       default qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:50:56:28:7a:8a brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.0.2.232/24 brd 192.0.2.255 scope global wlan0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::250:56ff:fe28:7a8a/64 scope link
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
4: gpd0: <POINTOPOINT,MULTICAST,NOARP> mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN group
       default qlen 500
    link/none
  • In this example, your sensor is plugged into interface eth0.

  • Your host IPv4 address will be on the line that starts with inet: In this case it is 169.254.0.1.

Note

If your interface IPv4 address is of the form 169.254.x.x, it is connected via link-local to the sensor. This means that the Linux self-assigned an IP address in the absence of a DHCP server.

Setting the Host Interface to DHCP

Use this to set your interface to automatically obtain an IP address via DHCP. This is useful for architectures that need to be more plug and play.

Note

It is recommended that you unplug the cable from the interface prior to making changes to the interface.

Via Command Line

Command

nmcli con modify [interface_name] ipv4.method auto ipv4.addresses ""

Example

with interface name eth0

username@ubuntu:~$ nmcli con modify eth0 ipv4.method auto ipv4.addresses ""

Response

 blank

 Note: However you can verify the change has been made with the ``ip addr`` command.
       There will be no ``inet`` line for the interface ``eth0`` until you plug in a cable
       to a device that has a DHCP server to provide an IPv4 address the interface

1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group
   default qlen 1000
   link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
   inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
   valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
   inet6 ::1/128 scope host
   valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: eth0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group
   default qlen 1000
   link/ether 00:0c:29:2b:cc:48 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
   inet6 fe80::be9f:d2a4:4451:3dfe/64 scope link noprefixroute
   valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
3: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group
   default qlen 1000
   link/ether 00:50:56:28:7a:8a brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
   inet 172.16.79.232/24 brd 172.16.79.255 scope global wlan0
   valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
   inet6 fe80::250:56ff:fe28:7a8a/64 scope link
   valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
Via GUI

The image below illustrates how to set the interface to Automatic (DHCP) mode using the graphical user interface.

Set interface to Automatic (DHCP) via the GUI

Setting the Host Interface to Static IP

Use this to set your interface to be assigned a static IPv4 address. This is useful for controlling the IP address that the sensor will be sending data to.

Note

It is recommended that you unplug the cable from the interface prior to making changes to the interface.

Via Command Line

Command

nmcli con modify [interface_name] ipv4.method manual ipv4.addresses [ip_address]

Example

with interface name eth0 and IPv4 address 192.0.2.1/24.

username@ubuntu:~$ nmcli con modify eth0 ipv4.method manual ipv4.addresses 192.0.2.1/24

Note

The /24 is shorthand for Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0

Response

blank

Note: However you can verify the change has been made with the ``ip addr`` command.
      The ``inet`` line for the interface ``eth0`` will show the static IPv4 address. e.g. ``192.0.2.1``

   1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group
          default qlen 1000
       link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
       inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
          valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
       inet6 ::1/128 scope host
          valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
   2: eth0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group
          default qlen 1000
       link/ether 00:0c:29:2b:cc:48 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
       inet 192.0.2.1/24 brd 192.0.2.255 scope global noprefixroute eth0
          valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
       inet6 fe80::be9f:d2a4:4451:3dfe/64 scope link noprefixroute
          valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
   3: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group
          default qlen 1000
       link/ether 00:50:56:28:7a:8a brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
       inet 172.16.79.232/24 brd 172.16.79.255 scope global wlan0
          valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
       inet6 fe80::250:56ff:fe28:7a8a/64 scope link
          valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
Via GUI

The image below illustrates how to set the interface to Manual (static) mode using the graphical user interface.

Set interface to Manual (static) via the GUI

Finding a Sensor with mDNS Service Discovery

The sensor announces its presence on the network using Multicast Domain Name Service (mDNS) with a service type named _roger._tcp. You can use service discovery tools such as avahi-browse (Linux) to find all sensors connected to the network.

  1. Find all sensors and their associated service text which includes the sensor IPv4 address using avahi-browse and the sensor service type _roger._tcp.

Command

avahi-browse -lrt [service type]

Example

username@ubuntu:~$ avahi-browse -lrt _roger._tcp

Response

+   eth0 IPv6 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp          local
+   eth0 IPv4 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp         local
=   eth0 IPv6 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp          local
   hostname = [|os-sn|]
   address = [fe80::be0f:a7ff:fe00:1852]
   port = [7501]
   txt = ["fw=ousteros-image-prod-aries-v2.0.0-20200417193957" "sn=99201000067
8" "pn=840-102145-B"]
=   eth0 IPv4 Ouster Sensor |sn|                    _roger._tcp          local
   hostname = [|os-sn|]
   address = []
   port = [7501]
   txt = ["fw=ousteros-image-prod-aries-v2.0.0-20200417193957" "sn= |sn|"
          "pn=840-102145-B"]

Note

In this example, your sensor IPv4 address is determined to be 169.254.0.123.